Pete Carroll
Pete Carroll

Celebrity Profile

Name: Pete Carroll
Occupation: Football Coach
Current Team: Seattle Seahawks
Gender: Male
Birth Day: September 15, 1951
Age: 69
Birth Place: San Francisco, United States
Zodiac Sign: Virgo

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Weight: in kg - N/A
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Pete Carroll

Pete Carroll was born on September 15, 1951 in San Francisco, United States (69 years old). Pete Carroll is a Football Coach, zodiac sign: Virgo. Pete Carroll plays for the team Seattle Seahawks. Find out Pete Carrollnet worth 2020, salary 2020 detail bellow.

Trivia

His first NFL head coaching job was with the New York Jets in 1994, but after going 6-10 in his first season, he was fired.

Net Worth

Net Worth 2020

$30 Million

Salary 2020

$8 Million

Pete Carroll Salary Detail

Pete Carroll Salary
What is Pete Carroll's salary? $8 million

Before Fame

He was a star athlete at Redwood High School in Larkspur, California, playing quarterback, wide receiver and defensive back as well as competing in basketball and baseball.

Biography Timeline

1969

Carroll was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Rita (née Ban) and James Edward "Jim" Carroll. Two of his paternal great-grandparents were Irish immigrants, and his Croatian maternal grandparents emigrated from around the region of Šibenik. Carroll attended Redwood High School in Larkspur, California. After being an athlete in childhood, his lack of physical growth as a teenager caused him frustration in high school sports; weighing just 110 pounds (50 kg) as an incoming freshman, he was required to bring a special doctor's clearance in order to try out for football. He was a multi-sport star in football (playing quarterback, wide receiver, and defensive back), basketball, and baseball, earning the school's Athlete of the Year honors as a senior in 1969. He was inducted into the charter class of the Redwood High School Athletic Hall of Fame in April 2009. Carroll has stated that one of his favorite players growing up was LSU defensive back Tommy Casanova, and that LSU was a place that he always wanted to coach.

1973

After high school, Carroll attended junior college at the nearby College of Marin, where he played football for two years (lettering in his second year) before transferring to the University of the Pacific, where he was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. At Pacific, Carroll played free safety for two years for the Tigers, earning All-Pacific Coast Athletic Conference honors both years (1971–72) and earning his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in 1973.

1976

Carroll's energetic and positive personality made a good impression on his head coach, Chester Caddas. When Caddas found out Carroll was interested in coaching, he offered him a job as a graduate assistant on his staff at Pacific. Carroll agreed and enrolled as a graduate student, earning a secondary teaching credential and Master's degree in physical education in 1976, while serving as a graduate assistant for three years and working with the wide receivers and secondary defenders. The assistants at Pacific during this time included a number of other future successful coaches, including Greg Robinson, Jim Colletto, Walt Harris, Ted Leland, and Bob Cope. Carroll was inducted into the Pacific Athletic Hall of Fame in 1995.

1980

When Monte Kiffin was named head coach of North Carolina State University in 1980, he brought Carroll in as his defensive coordinator and secondary coach. In 1983, Bob Cope became head coach of Pacific and brought Carroll on as assistant head coach and defensive coordinator.

1984

Carroll left Pacific after a year and entered the NFL in 1984 as the defensive backs coach of the Buffalo Bills. The next year, he moved onto the Minnesota Vikings where he held a similar position for five seasons (1985–89). In 1989, he was a candidate for the head coaching position at Stanford University; the position went to Dennis Green. His success with the Vikings led to his hiring by the New York Jets, where he served as defensive coordinator under Bruce Coslet for four seasons (1990–93). Carroll and Coslet had known each other for many years by that time, as Carroll's older brother was Coslet's college roommate. When there was an opening for the Vikings' head coach position in 1992, he was a serious candidate but lost the position, again to Green.

1994

In 1994, Carroll was elevated to Head Coach of the Jets. Known for his energy and youthful enthusiasm, Carroll painted a basketball court in the parking lot of the team's practice facility where he and his assistant coaches regularly played three-on-three games during their spare time. The Jets got off to a 6–5 start under Carroll, but in Week 12, he was the victim of Dan Marino's "clock play"—a fake spike that became a Miami Dolphins game-winning touchdown. The Jets lost all of their remaining games to finish 6–10. He was fired after one season.

1997

Carroll was hired for the next season by the San Francisco 49ers, where he served as defensive coordinator for the following two seasons (1995–96). His return to success as the defensive coordinator led to his hiring as the head coach of the New England Patriots in 1997, replacing coach Bill Parcells, who had resigned after disputes with the team's ownership. His 1997 Patriots team won the AFC East division title, but his subsequent two teams did not fare as well—losing in the wild card playoff round in 1998, and missing the playoffs after a late-season slide in 1999—and he was fired after the 1999 season. Patriots owner Robert Kraft said firing Carroll was one of the toughest decisions he has had to make since buying the team, stating, "A lot of things were going on that made it difficult for him to stay, some of which were out of his control. And it began with following a legend." His combined NFL record as a head coach was 33–31, and he was later considered a much better fit for college football than the NFL after his success at USC.

Carroll actively pursued the position, as his daughter, Jaime, was then a player on the school's successful volleyball team. After the first three primary candidates turned down the position, USC hired Carroll. Under Garrett, USC had tried to recruit Carroll to be their head coach in 1997, while he was coaching the Patriots, but Carroll was unable to take the position. The second time the opening came up, Daryl Gross, then senior associate athletic director for USC, recommended Carroll to Garrett based on his experience as a former scout for the New York Jets while Carroll coached there. Garrett cited Carroll's intelligence, energy and reputation as a defensive specialist as reasons for his hire.

2000

Carroll was named the Trojans' head coach on December 15, 2000, signing a five-year contract after USC had gone through a tumultuous 18-day search to replace fired coach Paul Hackett. He was not the Trojans' first choice, and was considered a long shot as the USC Athletic Department under Director Mike Garrett initially planned to hire a high-profile coach with recent college experience. Meanwhile Carroll, who had not coached in over a year and not coached in the college ranks since 1983, drew unfavorable comparisons to the outgoing Hackett.

2001

Carroll's wife Glena (née Goranson) played indoor volleyball at the University of the Pacific. Together the couple have three children: elder son Brennan, daughter Jaime, and younger son Nate.. Both Brennan and Nate are part of the Seattle Seahawks coaching staff. Through Brennan and his wife Amber, he has one grandchild, Dillon Brennan Carroll. Brennan Carroll played tight end at the University of Pittsburgh after transferring from University of Delaware; he graduated from Pitt in 2001 and joined his father as a graduate assistant (he is now an assistant coach). Jaime Carroll started attending USC in the fall of 2000, several months before her father was hired as football coach; she was a player on the Women of Troy's women's volleyball team. Nathan Carroll graduated from USC with a bachelor's degree in May 2010. In 2010, Nathan joined his father as an assistant for the Seahawks. Carroll's late father-in-law, Dean Goranson, graduated with a Master's degree from USC. His older brother, Jim Carroll, played tackle at Pacific, operated a few businesses in the upper Midwest, and is now retired in Phoenix, Arizona.

2002

Carroll was repeatedly approached regarding vacant head coach positions in the NFL beginning in 2002. Carroll hesitated to return to the NFL after his previous experiences, and said that his return would likely rest on control over personnel matters at a level unprecedented in the league. He had insisted over the years that he was happy at USC and that money was not an issue; he also was said to enjoy the Southern California lifestyle. When asked if he would retire at USC, Carroll responded:

2003

After moving to Los Angeles, Carroll was affected by the number of gang-related murders taking place in poorer areas. In April 2003, Carroll helped organize a meeting with political leaders, high-ranking law enforcement officials and representatives from social service, education and faith-based communities at USC's Heritage Hall for a brainstorming session. The result was the founding of A Better LA, a charity devoted to reducing violence in targeted urban areas of Los Angeles.

2004

When originally hired, Carroll signed a five-year contract worth approximately $1 million annually. He received a significant raise after the 2002 season and earned close to $3 million in the 2004 season, which ended with USC winning the BCS title in January 2005. He agreed to a contract extension in December 2005. His total compensation, including pay and benefits, for the 2007 fiscal year was $4,415,714.

2005

Carroll is known for his high-energy and often pleasant demeanor when coaching. In explaining his enthusiasm, Carroll has stated, "I always think something good's just about to happen." In a 2005 interview, Carroll explained his motivation:

2006

Carroll's team won a then-school record 34 straight games from 2003 to 2005, a streak that started after a triple-overtime loss to California and ended with the national championship game against the Texas Longhorns in the 2006 Rose Bowl. Fourteen of those games were later vacated for breaking NCAA rules. During his tenure, USC broke its average home attendance record four times in a row (they play at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum); the USC home attendance average in 2001, his first season, was 57,744; by 2006, it was over 91,000. During this period, USC had a 35-game winning streak at the Coliseum, spanning 6 years (2001-2007). The streak began on October 13, 2001, with a 48-17 win over the Arizona State Sun Devils and the final victory was a 47-14 win over the Washington State Cougars on September 22, 2007. The streak ended on October 6, 2007, with a 24–23 loss to the Stanford Cardinal who was a 41-point underdog. Prior to this the last loss was on September 29, 2001, (during Carroll's first year) to Stanford Cardinal 21-16. The success of USC football under Carroll led to a sharp rise in overall athletic department revenue, growing from $38.6 million in Carroll's first season at USC to more than $76 million in 2007–08.

2007

In July 2007, ESPN.com named USC its #1 team of the decade for the period between 1996 and 2006, primarily citing the Trojans' renaissance and dominance under Carroll. In 2007, his effect on the college football landscape was named one of the biggest developments over the past decade in ESPN the Magazine. In May 2008, Carroll was named the coach who did the most to define the first 10 years of the BCS Era.

2008

Within a year of his hiring, many prominent critics reversed course. In 2008, ESPN.com named Carroll's hiring number 1 in a list of the Pac-10's top ten moments of the BCS era.

2009

In April 2009, Carroll launched CampPete.com, a multi-player online game "billed as a ground-breaking Web site aimed at bringing Coach Carroll's unique Win Forever philosophy to kids all over the country by taking advantage of one of the hottest technology trends online, the virtual world." The site, which can be accessed by creating a virtual avatar, includes arcade-style games, motivational messages from Coach Carroll and a sports trivia section as well as a collection of virtual football skills workshops for kids. A portion of the proceeds from CampPete.com go to support A Better LA.

2010

On January 11, 2010, it was reported that Carroll would be leaving USC to coach the Seattle Seahawks. Carroll had told his players the previous evening that he would be resigning his position with the Trojans to become the new head coach of the Seattle Seahawks. According to the Los Angeles Times, Carroll came to agreement with the Seahawks on a 5-year $33 million contract to become head coach.

On June 9, 2010, The Los Angeles Times reported that Carroll, along with other active and former USC officials, had appeared in front of a ten-member NCAA Committee on Infractions the previous February. The next day, June 10, the NCAA announced sanctions against the USC football program including a two-year bowl ban, the elimination of thirty football scholarships, and forfeiture of some football victories from 2004 to 2005 (a season which had included winning the Bowl Championship Series title), and all team victories from the undefeated 2005–06 regular season, when USC lost to Texas in the BCS title game. With the vacated games removed, Carroll drops to fourth on USC's all-time wins list, behind John McKay, Howard Jones and John Robinson. His 97 on-field wins would put him ahead of Robinson for third in Trojan history.

Reacting to the USC sanctions in a video produced by his new employers, Carroll said on June 10, 2010, "I'm absolutely shocked and disappointed in the findings of the NCAA." He said in 2014 during a visit to USC, "I thought [the NCAA's investigation into USC] was dealt with poorly and very irrationally and done with way too much emotion instead of facts. I sat in the meetings. I listened to the people talk. I listened to the venom that they had for our program... They tried to make it out like it was something else. They made a terrible error." In 2015, he said, "We had so much success and we had so much fun doing it, it was uncommon for people to understand. ... I think it rubbed people the wrong way. There was such a bitterness."

On August 26, 2010, the Football Writers Association of America announced it would take back USC's 2004 Grantland Rice Trophy and leave that year's award vacant, the only vacancy in the over half century of the history of the award. The FWAA also said it would not consider USC as a candidate for the award for the 2010 season. New USC athletic director Pat Haden said USC would return the trophy, stating, "While we know that some fans and former student-athletes may be disappointed, our central priority at this time is our overall commitment to compliance and this action is in line with the standards we have set for our entire athletic program."

After the Seattle Seahawks fired head coach Jim L. Mora after one season, Carroll was rumored to be in the running for the job. On January 8, 2010, it was reported that Carroll was about to be hired as head coach of the Seahawks; the two parties were hammering out "minor details" in the pending contract. According to the Los Angeles Times, Carroll was "close to reaching an agreement with the Seattle Seahawks on Friday evening." On the morning of January 9, 2010, Carroll reportedly came to agreement with the Seahawks on a 5-year contract that would appoint him as head coach. He was officially hired as the Seahawks' head coach on January 11. He was also named executive vice president of football operations, effectively making him the Seahawks' general manager as well. While the Seahawks have a general manager in John Schneider, he serves mainly in an advisory role to Carroll, who has the final say in football matters. In fact, Schneider was actually hired by Carroll—a rare case of the head coach hiring the general manager.

2011

In 2011, Carroll again coached the Seahawks to a 7-9 record, but it was not enough to secure a playoff spot due to the ascendance of Carroll's old college rival coach Jim Harbaugh and division rival San Francisco 49ers, who finished with a 13-3 record. It was the first season the Seahawks had a starting quarterback other than Matt Hasselbeck in over a decade.

2012

In his third season with the Seahawks in 2012, Carroll, along with rookie quarterback Russell Wilson, led the team to an 11-5 record, including going undefeated at home. The 2012 season was Carroll's first winning season for the team. The Seahawks were also involved in controversy during Week 3's Monday Night Football game against the Green Bay Packers in Seattle, when the replacement officials called two different results for Russell Wilson's Hail Mary pass to wide receiver Golden Tate. The officials called the play in the Seahawks' favor, igniting a national outrage about the officiating. When the NFL referee lockout ended several days later, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell acknowledged that public furor over the call accelerated the eventual resolution of the labor dispute. Carroll's record was enough to post the team's second playoff berth, and the Seahawks won their Wild Card Round playoff game on the road against the Washington Redskins and fellow rookie quarterback Robert Griffin III, 24-14. Seattle lost the following week in the Divisional Round to the Atlanta Falcons at the Georgia Dome by a score of 30-28.

2014

In July 2014, Carroll was announced as a member of the 2015 USC Athletic Hall of Fame class.

On February 2, 2014, Carroll led the Seattle Seahawks to their first Super Bowl win in franchise history after defeating the Denver Broncos, 43–8, in Super Bowl XLVIII. Carroll joined Barry Switzer and Jimmy Johnson as the only coaches to win both an NCAA championship and a Super Bowl. At age 62, Carroll was the third-oldest coach to win a Super Bowl. Tom Coughlin was 65 when his Giants won Super Bowl XLVI and Dick Vermeil was 63 when the St. Louis Rams won Super Bowl XXXIV.

2015

The following season, the Seahawks started off their quest to repeat as champions with a 36–16 defeat of the Green Bay Packers on Thursday Night Football in the first game of the NFL season. A Super Bowl XLVIII rematch came in Week 3, with Seattle again defeating Peyton Manning and the Broncos, 26–20 in overtime. However, losses to San Diego, Dallas, St. Louis, and Kansas City caused the defending champions to start the season with a 6-4 record, three games behind the division leading Cardinals. After a team meeting following a Week 11 loss, the Seahawks finished the regular season 6-0 to finish with a 12-4 record. As the #1 seed in the playoffs, the Seahawks beat the Panthers in the Divisional Round, 31–17, to get to their second straight NFC Championship. After trailing 19–7 to the Packers with just over two minutes remaining in the NFC Championship, the Seahawks launched a furious comeback to force overtime. On the first possession of overtime, Russell Wilson hit wide receiver Jermaine Kearse for a game-winning touchdown that sent the Seahawks to their second straight Super Bowl. On February 1, 2015, Carroll's Seahawks lost Super Bowl XLIX to Carroll's former team, the New England Patriots, 28–24. With 25 seconds to go on second down and goal at the Patriots' 1-yard line, and the Seahawks trailing by four points, Carroll called for a pass play. Wilson's pass was intercepted by Patriots cornerback Malcolm Butler on the goal line, and the Patriots ran out the clock. Some have called Carroll's play-call on the play "the worst play-call in NFL history."

The 2015 offseason was one full of criticism for Carroll, Wilson, and offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell after the ending of Super Bowl XLIX. However, Carroll was praised by much of the national media for how he handled the adversity following the game. The Seahawks began the 2015 season by blowing fourth quarter leads to St. Louis, Green Bay, Cincinnati, Carolina, and Arizona. After losing at home on Sunday Night Football to the division leading Cardinals, Seattle sat at 4-5. However, Carroll rejuvenated his team enough to win their next five games, putting the Seahawks at 9-5 and clinching a playoff berth. Russell Wilson became the first quarterback to throw 19 or more touchdown passes without any interceptions over five or more wins. The Seahawks ended the regular season with a revengeful win against Arizona, beating the NFC West champions 36-6 on the road. Seattle entered the postseason as the #6 seed, winning its Wild Card matchup against the Minnesota Vikings after Vikings kicker Blair Walsh missed a 27-yard field goal for a final score of 10-9. The Seahawks would later fall to the Carolina Panthers in the Divisional Round 31-24, after being down 31-0 at the half, and as a result, the Seahawks would not reach a third consecutive Super Bowl appearance.

2016

On July 25, 2016, Carroll signed a three-year contract extension with the Seahawks that will keep him in Seattle through the 2019 season. Carroll's Seahawks once again had high expectations leading into the 2016 season, but injuries to key players on both sides of the ball eventually became too much to overcome. The Seahawks were able to start the season with a 4-1 record, despite Russell Wilson playing with a hurt ankle sustained in the season opener against the Miami Dolphins. In Week 10, the Seahawks travelled to New England to play the Patriots for the first time since the Super Bowl XLIX loss, and came away with a 31-24 victory to push the Seahawks to 6-2-1. Carroll notched his 100th regular-season win the following week against the Eagles. The Seahawks clinched the NFC West in Week 15, following a 24-3 victory over the Rams. It was Carroll's fourth NFC West division title in his seven seasons with the team, and sixth playoff appearance. In the Wild Card round, the Seahawks dominated the Detroit Lions in a 26-6 victory. The victory extended Seattle's playoff home game win streak to 10 consecutive wins, 6 of which have come under Carroll. The Seahawks were eliminated in the divisional round for the second straight year in 2016, losing 36-20 to the Atlanta Falcons. In his season-ending press conference, Carroll revealed that cornerback Richard Sherman had been playing with a "significant" MCL injury, which attracted attention because Sherman had not been listed on the injury report throughout the season.

2018

In the 2018 season, Carroll helped lead the Seahawks to a 10-6 record and a second place finish in the NFC West. The team returned to the playoffs, where they lost 24-22 to the Dallas Cowboys in the Wild Card Round. On October 16, 2018, Carroll reached win number 91 over the Oakland Raiders, becoming the Seahawks' all-time wins leader (including postseason), passing Mike Holmgren with a record of 91-56-1 at that point.

2019

On September 15, 2019, which was his 68th birthday, Carroll won his 100th game as the Seahawks head coach, defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers 28–26. With the team's record at 10–2 heading into Week 14, Carroll moved up five spots to 23rd-most on the all-time wins list, passing Weeb Ewbank (134), Mike McCarthy (135), Hank Stram (136), John Fox (141), and Mike Tomlin (141). Carroll's Seahawks finished the season at 11–5, finishing second in the NFC West behind the 13–3 49ers.

2020

As a fifth seed in the playoffs, the Seahawks defeated the Philadelphia Eagles 17-9 in the Wild Card round, before being eliminated in the Divisional round by the Green Bay Packers 28-23. Carroll coached the NFC team in the 2020 Pro Bowl.

Carroll was fined US$100,000 by the NFL for not properly wearing a face mask, as required for coaches during the COVID-19 pandemic, during a week 2 game in the 2020 NFL season on September 21, 2020. On November 8, 2020, Carroll and the Seahawks agreed to a four-year contract extension.

Family Life

Pete met his second wife Glena Goranson while he worked on the coaching staff at the University of the Pacific. Before marrying Glena in 1976, he was married to Wendy Pearl from 1973 to 1975. Pete has two sons named Brennan and Nathan and a daughter named Jaime.

Net Worth Comparison

Team Seattle Seahawks Net Worth / Salary
# Name Age Net Worth Salary Nationality
#1 Pete Carroll 69 $30 Million $8 Million United States
#2 Greg Olson 57 N/A N/A United States

🎂 Upcoming Birthday

Currently, Pete Carroll is 70 years, 0 months and 5 days old. Pete Carroll will celebrate 71st birthday on a Thursday 15th of September 2022. Below we countdown to Pete Carroll upcoming birthday.

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Recent Birthday Highlights

62nd birthday - Sunday, September 15, 2013

Extra points: Seahawks rout 49ers 29-3 on Pete Carroll's birthday

Marshawn Lynch scored three touchdowns as Seattle rolled to a 29-3 win over San Francisco on Pete Carroll's 62nd birthday.

Pete Carroll 62nd birthday timeline

Pete Carroll trends

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